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joint custody illinois

Parents often have questions about joint custody in Illinois during a divorce or separation. Joint child custody in Illinois requires planning and coordination.

It also requires knowledge of the law and legal process. An experienced family law attorney, such as those within the Vantage Group Legal Services network, can help you understand Illinois law and navigate the child custody process.

What Is Joint Custody in Illinois?

In Illinois, the law no longer uses the term child custody. Instead, the law now calls child custody the “allocation of parental responsibility.” Illinois law sets forth two types of custody: parenting responsibilities and parenting time. 

Parenting Responsibilities

Illinois law now calls legal custody “parenting responsibilities.” In Illinois, parental responsibilities are the legal authority to make significant life decisions regarding the child’s medical needs, education, and religion. These decisions include deciding where the child will primarily reside. One parent can have sole decision-making authority, or both parents can share this responsibility. Parents with shared parental responsibility must cooperate and communicate regularly to make mutually agreeable decisions about the child’s life.  

Parenting Time

Parenting time refers to each parent’s physical time with the child taking care of their day-to-day needs. While a child is with one parent, that parent has the authority to make decisions about the child’s health and safety in an emergency.

Parents with joint custody in Illinois will have relatively equal parenting time. These parents must figure out a schedule that is genuinely equal and is in the child’s best interests. The best way to coordinate schedules and share the responsibilities of raising a child is to write everything down in a parenting plan.

Parenting Plan 

Both parents typically file a parenting plan, either pursuant to a divorce proceeding or in an allocation of parental responsibilities (custody) proceeding. In the plan, parents set forth the decision-making authority for the child and describe a detailed parenting time schedule. The schedule should include regular daily parenting time as well as how the parents intend to split up the holidays. Typically, the parenting plan divides major holidays into two groups and then allocates parenting time into alternating year schedules. 

A detailed parenting plan is essential for joint legal custody. Parents often find it challenging to communicate with each other after a breakup. A detailed parenting plan can help ease tensions and facilitate the transition from a breakup into a healthy co-parenting relationship. A parenting plan also gives the child a routine that fosters a sense of stability. 

In a court case, parents may file their own proposed parenting plans if they cannot come to a mutual agreement. A court will then decide. An experienced family attorney can work to get the best parenting plan for you and your children.

What are the Most Common Joint Custody Schedules?

When creating a joint custody plan, it’s important to look at a calendar and consider what you and your child can do. Sometimes, a 50/50 split in parenting time is not feasible because of work or your child’s activities. 

Let’s look at some examples of common joint custody schedules.

Alternating Weeks

In an alternating week schedule, the child is with Parent A for one week and then with Parent B the following week. The week typically begins and ends on a Friday after school or work.

Two Weeks Each

With a two-week schedule, each parent has the child for two weeks at a time. As with the alternating week schedule, the two weeks typically begin and end on a Friday.

Mid-Week Overnight

The above schedules could include one mid-week overnight with the co-parent. Another option would be a mid-week dinner or lunch with the co-parent.

2-2-3 Schedule

This would be a plan where the child lives with Parent A for two days, then with Parent B for two days, and then goes back to Parent A for three days. This rotation continues the following week. If the week begins on a Monday, this plan allows both parents the opportunity to spend alternating weekends with the child.

2-2-5-5 Schedule

This is a plan where the child lives with Parent A for two days, then Parent B for two days. Then the child returns to Parent A for five days, followed by five days with Parent B. This is a two-week schedule.

3-3-4-4 Schedule

In this schedule, the child lives with Parent A for three days and then Parent B for three days. Then they go back to Parent A for four days, followed by another four days with Parent B. You can also use a 3-4-4-3 schedule, where the child spends three days with Parent A, four days with Parent B, another four days with Parent A, and then three more days with Parent B.

Every Other Weekend

This is not an equal split parenting time schedule. Here, one parent has the child most of the time, but the other parent gets the child every other weekend.

60/40 Plan

In this plan, Parent A has the child for four days, and then Parent B has the child for three days. These three days can be an extended weekend.

How Does Child Support Work in Joint Custody Arrangements?

In Illinois, child support laws and joint custody are somewhat related. The amount of time each parent spends with a child impacts child support, but joint custody does not automatically eliminate child support. 

Child support is also based on each parent’s proportion of a fictional household income. This fictional income is the amount of income the child would benefit from if the parents lived together. Thus, if one parent makes significantly less, a court may still order child support even if the parents share joint custody. The Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services website has a calculator that can help you estimate child support obligations.

Can Joint-Custody Parents Make Modifications to their Parenting Plan?

If one parent’s schedule changes significantly or the child’s needs change, you can ask the court to modify a parenting plan. However, the court will not generally permit a modification before an established parenting plan is at least two years old.

Consult with Our Experienced Attorneys on Joint Custody

Getting representation to advocate for joint custody in Illinois doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive. With the Vantage Group Legal Services subscription service, you have access to experienced attorneys at a price that won’t break the bank. Contact us today for a free no-obligation consultation.

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